Weekly Recommendation: Fell

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This week the recommendation takes the form of a hugely delayed and on hiatus comic book series, however despite the hiatus the 9issues that saw the light of day (for now) are still well worth a read. The series is question is Warren Ellis’s ‘Fell’ which follows a homicide detective aptly named ‘Richard Fell’ who is transferred from his old post across the bridge to Snowtown, a city rife with urban decay of America’s worst inner cities and the poverty of a third-world country. At one point described as a “feral city,” Snowtown’s denizens are generally desperate and hostile. Violence is commonplace, with whole chunks of the city devoid of proper utilities, services and basic amenities. So hopeless is the city that the citizenry have begun spray painting giant S’s that have been crossed out as a form of protective magic, in the hopes that Snowtown will not harm what has been labelled as its own. The city itself and the views of this are a great reason to read this book alone, but there’s more to it than this…..

fellThe city is a great reason to read this book, as it does seem to have a life and personality of its own- and most of this is due to the great artwork of Ben Templesmith (a favourite of mine) who’s use of colour really helps the city fell desperate and rotten and gives it a real sense of danger. This is the kind of book that Templesmith was made to draw, a real dark and gritty looking book based in a town that is straight out of a nightmare.

Each issue is also a self contained story, which really helps give the book a procedural feel and means that each case is open and shut, helping to keep the focus squarely on the main character and the city itself. Each of these cases really feels like a real consequence of the city and the way it forces it citizens to live helps add to the whole feeling of desperation that the book forces it characters into, and you really begin to get the feeling that the city is the real route of all the ills of the town and its people. The way this is portrayed is amazingly well done, as you soon start to feel for the citizens despite their horrific crimes and lifestyles as you begin to wonder how you could do anything differently.

Fell NunOther than ‘Richard Fell’ the only other recurring character is a random nun, who has appeared at several occasions in the book. She looks like a heavy set short lady wearing a ‘Richard Nixon’ mask with very small and black pupils. She has so far been seen buying ice cream, hiring a prostitute, robbing a beggar and buying a firearm. I’m sure she has a larger role to play in the grand scheme of the book and the city but what this is, has yet to be revealed. But surely in the grand scheme of such a deprived and hostile city- the holy representative turned bad (maybe by the city) must have a greater role to play.

 

The book is due a tenth a issue, and has been on hiatus since 2010 but the latest issue is currently scripted and sent to the publisher (Image) so there are huge hopes that this book will once again see the lights of day.

But until then you owe it to yourself to read the first 9issues, as this is a real gem of a book that didn’t get the right level of attention it deserved.

 

That’s it for this week, see you next week with more recommendations to kill your time.

HomicideHomicide detective Richard Fell is transferred from his old post across the bridge to Snowtown, a city rife with urban decay of America’s worst inner cities and the poverty of a third-world country. At one point described as a “feral city,” Snowtown’s denizens are generally desperate, hostile, or both. Violence is commonplace, with whole chunks of the city devoid of proper utilities, services and basic amenities. So hopeless is the city that the citizenry have begun spraypainting giant S’s that have been crossed out as a form of protective magic, in the hopes that Snowtown will not harm what has been labelled as its own.  detective Richard Fell is transferred from his old post across the bridge to Snowtown, a city rife with urban decay of America’s worst inner cities and the poverty of a third-world country. At one point described as a “feral city,” Snowtown’s denizens are generally desperate, hostile, or both. Violence is commonplace, with whole chunks of the city devoid of proper utilities, services and basic amenities. So hopeless is the city that the citizenry have begun spraypainting giant S’s that have been crossed out as a form of protective magic, in the hopes that Snowtown will not harm what has been labelled as its own. 

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